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Paddy Driscoll
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Football Player
    (January 11, 1895-June 29, 1968)
    Born in Evanston, Illinois
    Birth name was John Leo Driscoll
    Attended Northwestern University
    Quarterback/halfback for the Hammond All-Stars (1917), Great Lakes Navy (1918), Hammond Pros (1919), Chicago Cardinals (1920-25), Decatur Staleys (1920, one game) and the Chicago Bears (1926-29)
    NFL Champion (1925)
    Head coach for the Chicago Cardinals (1920-22), Marquette University (1937-40) and the Chicago Bears (1956-57)
    Assistant coach for the Chicago Bears (1941-55, 1958-62)
    Played baseball for the Chicago Cubs (1917)
    Inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame (1965)
    Inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame (1974)
    He played baseball for the Cubs for 13 games, resulting in him being ruled ineligible by Northwestern University.
    Spectators booed him for punting away against Red Grange on Thanksgiving Day (1925).
    His coaching tenure at Marquette University was uneventful.
    He coached the Bears to the NFL Championship Game only to lose to the New York Giants, 7-47, in his first year as the team's head coach.
    He closed his head coaching career with a losing season.
    He named his son, John Jr..
    He served in the Navy during World War I.
    He was a member of the Great Lakes Navy football team that won the 1919 Rose Bowl.
    He set an NFL record for points scored in a single game with 27 (1923).
    He recorded a field goal in which he dropped kicked at 50 yards (1924).
    He set an NFL record for dropkicked field goals in a single game with 4 (1925).
    He was considered as one of the best drop kickers and players in the 1920s as a triple-threat man.
    He was the very first player to be described as a 'franchise player' in a team's success.
    George Halas had a long friendship with him and said that he was the greatest athlete he had ever known.

Credit: Neo NX2004


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