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Bill Terry
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Baseball Player
    (October 30, 1898-January 9, 1989)
    Born in Atlanta, Georgia
    First baseman for the New York Giants (1923-36)
    .341 career batting average
    2,193 hits
    154 home runs
    1,078 runs batted in
    Three-time All-Star (1933-35)
    Managed the New York Giants (1932-41)
    823-661 win-loss record
    #3 retired by the Giants
    Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame (1954)
    While playing in the minor leagues in Shreveport, his salary was so low that he had to pawn his wife’s wedding ring to buy food.
    When Giants manager John McGraw chastised him for a fielding error, he replied, ‘You've been blaming other people for the mistakes you have made for 30 years.’ The pair would not speak to each other for two years (1930-32).
    He had a contentious relationship with sportswriters, who he dismissed as ‘$25 a week clerks.’
    His most famous comment to the press came back to bite him in the ass: Asked about the Brooklyn Dodgers’ chances to win the 1934 pennant, he quipped, ‘I haven’t heard anything from them. Are they still in the league?’ In a doubleheader at the end of the season, the fired-up Dodgers defeated the Giants, who wound up narrowly losing the pennant to the St. Louis Cardinals.
    He was married to Elvena Sneed for 66 years until her death.
    He was left handed.
    He was the last player to hit .400 or better in the National League (.401 in 1930).
    After he led the Giants from being out of first by eleven games in mid-July to a pennant win (1936), Pirates manager Pie Traynor said, ‘I don't think any other man in baseball could have finagled the Giants into a World Series.’
    After retiring from baseball he opened a Buick dealership, which became so successful that he turned down an offer to manage the Dodgers (1953), because it would cut too much into his income.

Credit: C. Fishel


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